Software projects for Engineering Students

Software projects for Engineering Students

Welcome to BPUT Engineering College Projects. This College Projects for Computer Science & IT students Which helps to BPUT student those are know the java and .net but they do not know how to do the Bput Engineering College Dummy Projects of 7th & 8th Semester. This websites helps them to do the dummy college projects, which help them getting mark and also help their campus recruitment time. Any one can by this projects in our office near patia chhak, Bhubaneswar. And price of the project vary from project to project. Minimum price of one project is Rs. 1,200 /-.
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Software projects for Engineering Students

In the 1970s and 1980s, the software industry grew very quickly, as computer companies quickly recognized the relatively low cost of software production compared to hardware production and circuitry. To manage new development efforts, companies applied the established project management methods, but project schedules slipped during test runs, especially when confusion occurred in the gray zone between the user specifications and the delivered software. To be able to avoid these problems, software project management methods focused on matching user requirements to delivered products, in a method known now as the waterfall model. As the industry has matured, analysis of software project management failures has shown that the following are the most common causes:[2] Unrealistic or unarticulated project goals Inaccurate estimates of needed resources Badly defined system requirements Poor reporting of the project's status Unmanaged risks Poor communication among customers, developers, and users Use of immature technology Inability to handle the project's complexity Sloppy development practices Poor project management Stakeholder politics Commercial pressures

Software projects for Engineering Students

The first three items in the list above show the difficulties articulating the needs of the client in such a way that proper resources can deliver the proper project goals. Specific software project management tools are useful and often necessary, but the true art in software project management is applying the correct method and then using tools to support the method. Without a method, tools are worthless. Since the 1960s, several proprietary software project management methods have been developed by software manufacturers for their own use, while computer consulting firms have also developed similar methods for their clients. Today software project management methods are still evolving, but the current trend leads away from the waterfall model to a more cyclic project delivery model that imitates a . Software development process A software development process is concerned primarily with the production aspect of software development, as opposed to the technical aspect, such as software tools. These processes exist primarily for supporting the management of software development, and are generally skewed toward addressing business concerns. Many software development processes can be run in a similar way to general project management processes. Examples are: Risk management is the process of measuring or assessing risk and then developing strategies to manage the risk. In general, the strategies employed include transferring the risk to another party, avoiding the risk, reducing the negative effect of the risk, and accepting some or all of the consequences of a particular risk. Risk management in software project management begins with the business case for starting the project, which includes a cost-benefit analysis as well as a list of fallback options for project failure, called a contingency plan. A subset of risk management that is gaining more and more attention is Opportunity Management, which means the same thing, except that the potential risk outcome will have a positive, rather than a negative impact. Though theoretically handled in the same way, using the term "opportunity" rather than the somewhat negative term "risk" helps to keep a team focused on possible positive outcomes of any given risk register in their projects, such as spin-off projects, windfalls, and free extra resources. Requirements management is the process of identifying, eliciting, documenting, analyzing, tracing, prioritizing and agreeing on requirements and then controlling change and communicating to relevant stakeholders. New or altered computer system[1] Requirements management, which includes Requirements analysis, is an important part of the software engineering process; whereby business analysts or software developers identify the needs or requirements of a client; having identified these requirements they are then in a position to design a solution. Change management is the process of identifying, documenting, analyzing, prioritizing and agreeing on changes to scope (project management) and then controlling changes and communicating to relevant stakeholders. Change impact analysis of new or altered scope, which includes Requirements analysis at the change level, is an important part of the software engineering process; whereby business analysts or software developers identify the altered needs or requirements of a client; having identified these requirements they are then in a position to re-design or modify a solution. Theoretically, each change can impact the timeline and budget of a software project, and therefore by definition must include risk-benefit analysis before approval. Software configuration management is the process of identifying, and documenting the scope itself, which is the software product underway, including all sub-products and changes and enabling communication of these to relevant stakeholders. In general, the processes employed include version control, naming convention (programming), and software archival agreements. Release management is the process of identifying, documenting, prioritizing and agreeing on releases of software and then controlling the release schedule and communicating to relevant stakeholders. Most software projects have access to three software environments to which software can be released; Development, Test, and Production. In very large projects, where distributed teams need to integrate their work before releasing to users, there will often be more environments for testing, called unit testing, system testing, or integration testing, before release to User acceptance testing (UAT). A subset of release management that is gaining more and more attention is Data Management, as obviously the users can only test based on data that they know, and "real" data is only in the software environment called "production". In order to test their work, programmers must therefore also often create "dummy data" or "data stubs". Traditionally, older versions of a production system were once used for this purpose, but as companies rely more and more on outside contributors for software development, company data may not be released to development teams. In complex environments, datasets may be created that are then migrated across test environments according to a test release schedule, much like the overall software release schedule. Project planning, monitoring and control

Software projects for Engineering Students

The purpose of project planning is to identify the scope of the project, estimate the work involved, and create a project schedule. Project planning begins with requirements that define the software to be developed. The project plan is then developed to describe the tasks that will lead to completion. The purpose of project monitoring and control is to keep the team and management up to date on the project's progress. If the project deviates from the plan, then the project manager can take action to correct the problem. Project monitoring and control involves status meetings to gather status from the team. When changes need to be made, change control is used to keep the products up to date. Issue In computing, the term issue is a unit of work to accomplish an improvement in a system. An issue could be a bug, a requested feature, task, missing documentation, and so forth. The word "issue" should not be misunderstood as just a synonym for "problem," as in other English usage. For example, OpenOffice.org used to call their modified version of BugZilla IssueZilla. As of September 2010, they call their system Issue Tracker. Problems occur from time to time and fixing them in a timely fashion is essential to achieve correctness of a system and avoid delayed deliveries of products. Severity levels Issues are often categorized in terms of severity levels. Different companies have different definitions of severities, but some of the most common ones are:

Software projects for Engineering Students

Critical High The bug or issue affects a crucial part of a system, and must be fixed in order for it to resume normal operation. Medium The bug or issue affects a minor part of a system, but has some impact on its operation. This severity level is assigned when a non-central requirement of a system is affected. Low The bug or issue affects a minor part of a system, and has very little impact on its operation. This severity level is assigned when a non-central requirement of a system (and with lower importance) is affected. Cosmetic The system works correctly, but the appearance does not match the expected one. For example: wrong colors, too much or too little spacing between contents, incorrect font sizes, typos, etc. This is the lowest severity issue. In many software companies, issues are often investigated by Quality Assurance Analysts when they verify a system for correctness, and then assigned to the developer(s) that are responsible for resolving them. They can also be assigned by system users during the User Acceptance Testing (UAT) phase. Issues are commonly communicated using Issue or Defect Tracking Systems. In some other cases, emails or instant messengers are used.

Software projects for Engineering Students

There is a vital need to draw the free software community's attention to the ongoing development work on these particular projects. The FSF high-priority projects list serves to foster the development of projects that are important for increasing the adoption and use of free software and free software operating systems. Our list helps guide volunteers and supporters to projects where their skills can be utilized, whether they be in coding, graphic design, writing, or activism. The FSF does not ask to run or control these projects; some of them are in fact GNU projects (and all are welcome to apply), but we are happy to encourage them whether they are done under our auspices or not. We hope that you can find a project here where your skill, energy, and time can be put to good use. Some of the most important projects on our list are replacement projects. These projects are important because they address areas where users are continually being seduced into using nonfree software by the lack of an adequate free replacement. SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT LIFE CYCLE [SDLC] Information: Software Development Life Cycle, or Software Development Process, defines the steps/stages/phases in the building of software.

Software projects for Engineering Students

There are various kinds of software development models like: Waterfall model Spiral model Iterative and incremental development (like ‘Unified Process’ and ‘Rational Unified Process’) Agile development (like ‘Extreme Programming’ and ‘Scrum’) Models are evolving with time and the development life cycle can vary significantly from one model to the other. It is beyond the scope of this particular article to discuss each model. However, each model comprises of all or some of the following phases/activities/tasks. SDLC IN SUMMARY

Software projects for Engineering Students

Project Planning Requirements Development Estimation Scheduling Design Coding Test Build/Deployment Unit Testing Integration Testing User Documentation System Testing Acceptance Testing Production Build/Deployment Release Maintenance SDLC IN DETAIL

Software projects for Engineering Students

Project Planning Prepare Review Rework Baseline Revise [if necessary] >> Review >> Rework >> Baseline Requirements Development[Business Requirements and Software/Product Requirements] Develop Review Rework Baseline Revise [if necessary] >> Review >> Rework >> Baseline Estimation[Size / Effort / Cost] Scheduling Designing[ High Level Design and Detail Design] Coding Code Review Rework Commit Recode [if necessary] >> Review >> Rework >> Commit Test Builds Preparation/Deployment Build/Deployment Plan Prepare Review Rework Baseline Revise [if necessary] >> Review >> Rework >> Baseline Build/Deploy Unit Testing Test Plan Prepare Review Rework Baseline Revise [if necessary] >> Review >> Rework >> Baseline Test Cases/Scripts Prepare Review Rework Baseline Execute Revise [if necessary] >> Review >> Rework >> Baseline >> Execute Integration Testing User Documentation Prepare Review Rework Baseline Revise [if necessary] >> Review >> Rework >> Baseline System Testing Acceptance Testing[ Internal Acceptance Test and External Acceptance Test] Production Build/Deployment Release Prepare Review Rework Release Maintenance Recode [Enhance software / Fix bugs] Retest Redeploy Rerelease

Software projects for Engineering Students

Notes: The life cycle mentioned here is NOT set in stone and each phase does not necessarily have to be implemented in the order mentioned. Though SDLC uses the term ‘Development’, it does not focus just on the coding tasks done by developers but incorporates the tasks of all stakeholders, including testers. There may still be many other activities/ tasks which have not been specifically mentioned above, like Configuration Management. No matter what, it is essential that you clearly understand the software development life cycle your project is following. One issue that is widespread in many projects is that software testers are involved much later in the life cycle, due to which they lack visibility and authority (which ultimately compromises software quality). Lifecycle delivers cloud based back office solutions to a converging telecommunications industry. This includes prepay, postpay and wholesale provisioning and billing solutions. We do this for companies all over the world and work with a large number of International Carriers and Mobile Operators. This includes companies like, Gamma, EE, H3G, P4U, Transatel and x-Mobility. Our solutions allow our customers to Provision, Bill and Report on Mobile, VoIP, Fixed Line, OTT and Utility services in a converged single touch environment. Based in the UK, we have over 18 years’ experience in telecommunications with a proven track record of delivering complex solutions to the following types of companies: Mobile Industry (MNO’s MVNA’s, MVNE’s and MVNO’s). Fixed Line Carriers Mobile and Fixed line Resellers and Switch-less Resellers VoIP Carriers and Resellers Lifecycle’s systems and people are of the highest quality as confirmed by our customers' feedback and our ongoing commitment to developing high quality, innovative billing solutions for our customers Our year on year investment in R&D, coupled with our desire to exploit advances in technology, makes our ALLinONE platform an industry leading solution. This gives our customers a critical edge in their customer dealings, image and business processes. Lifecycle's philosophy to our customers is to deliver more than expected for less than anticipated. So, if you are looking for a business partner rather than just another software supplier, contact us and prepare to be pleasantly surprised. Definition - What does Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) mean? The software development life cycle (SDLC) is a framework defining tasks performed at each step in the software development process. SDLC is a structure followed by a development team within the software organization. It consists of a detailed plan describing how to develop, maintain and replace specific software. The life cycle defines a methodology for improving the quality of software and the overall development process. This term is also known as the software development process. Techopedia explains Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) SDLC consists of following activities: Planning: The most important parts of software development, requirement gathering or requirement analysis are usually done by the most skilled and experienced software engineers in the organization. After the requirements are gathered from the client, a scope document is created in which the scope of the project is determined and documented. Implementation: The software engineers start writing the code according to the client's requirements.

Software projects for Engineering Students

Testing: This is the process of finding defects or bugs in the created software. Documentation: Every step in the project is documented for future reference and for the improvement of the software in the development process. The design documentation may include writing the application programming interface (API). Deployment and maintenance: The software is deployed after it has been approved for release. Maintaining: Software maintenance is done for future reference. Software improvement and new requirements (change requests) can take longer than the time needed to create the initial development of the software. There are several software development models followed by various organizations: Waterfall Model: This model involves finishing the first phase completely before commencing the next one. When each phase is completed successfully, it is reviewed to see if the project is on track and whether it is feasible to continue. V-Shaped Model: This model focuses on execution of processes in a sequential manner, similar to the waterfall model but with more importance placed on testing. Testing procedures are written even before the commencement of writing code. A system plan is generated before starting the development phase. Incremental Model: This life cycle model involves multiple development cycles. The cycles are divided up into smaller iterations. These iterations can be easily managed and go through a set of phases including requirements, design, implementation and testing. A working version of the software is produced during the first iteration, so working software is created early in the development process.